Tips to Protect Your Eyes This Summer

1. Wear sunglasses complete with UV protection

Too much exposure to UVR can cause photokeratitis or photo conjunctivitis (more commonly known as “snow blindness”) in the short-term. Continual UVR exposure, particularly exposure to UVB rays, may cause cataracts development, pterygium (a non-cancerous growth over the cornea) or skin cancer of the eyelids.

2. Use Goggles at the Pool

Frequent exposure to chlorine negatively affects the integrity of your corneal epithelium. The epithelium provides a layer of protection to your cornea from irritants and pathogens. If that protection is compromised, you have an increased likelihood of corneal abrasion or other eye injuries.

3. Wash hands and avoid rubbing eyes

Studies indicate that the best way to protect yourself from the spread of communicable disease is simply to wash your hands on a regular basis. This practice is crucial to avoid contracting eye-related conditions such as conjunctivitis. You often develop conjunctivitis after touching something that someone else has touched after they rubbed their eyes.

4. Wear hats

Have your child wear a hat with a wide brim.  It not only provides additional protection against sunburn on susceptible areas like the nose, neck and ears, but it also helps to protect their eyes from harmful UV rays.  Not all sunlight enters the eye direct from the front.  Have your child wear a hat with a wide brim.  It not only provides additional protection against sunburn on susceptible areas like the nose, neck and ears, but it also helps to protect their eyes from harmful UV rays.  Not all sunlight enters the eye direct from the front.  

5. Wear eye protection during outdoor activities

You should try to protect yourself, as much as practically possible, from contact with foreign bodies including sand) that can cause abrasions to your eye. If a child gets sand into his eyes, take the child immediately to a sink with running water. Do not allow them to rub their eyes as this can scratch the outer layer of the eye known as the cornea. Use a clean cup to pour water over the eyes to remove sand. Encourage blinking and do not discourage crying, because tears remove eye irritants. If flushing and blinking does not work, seek immediate medical attention.

6. Opt for shade when possible

Opt for shade whenever possible, especially between 10am and 2pm when the sunlight is the strongest.

7. Drink plenty of water

During the summer, people are more likely to become dehydrated, which can affect their eyes. Serious dehydration makes it harder for the body to produce tears, leading to dry eye symptoms and other vision problems. Drinking plenty of water each day can prevent and reverse many of the negative effects of dehydration, as well as providing fluid for normal eye function.

8. Use eye drops when needed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *